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Adam Savage wrote:

Hi, guys —

  • What is the name of the God Catholics pray to?
  • Who was the Christian deity talking to when he said this line?

"And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth."

Genesis 1:26

  • What is the name of this Christian deity?

Adam

  { What is the name of the God Catholics pray to and who is talking in Genesis 1:26? }

Paul replied:

Hi, Adam —

There are two viable possibilities (and perhaps more). One is that He was talking to the angels He had already created. Angels are spiritual persons who are instrumental in carrying out God's Word.

Another possibility is that the Father was talking to the Son and the Holy Spirit. Then we could include each Person of the Trinity, in as much as we recognize that:

  • by the Father things are made
  • through the Son all things are made, and
  • in the Life of the Holy Spirit things are made.

Also, man is made in the Trinitarian image of God because God is Love. In Him there is:

  1. Lover (Father)
  2. Beloved (Son), and
  3. Love (Holy Spirit).

This same paradigm can be applied to human life, particularly in father, mother, and child who proceeds from their love.

Paul

Mike replied:

Hi, Adam —

You said:

  • Who was the Christian deity talking to when he said this line?

"And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth."

Genesis 1:26

Most definitely the Trinity, in the Divine Persons of:

  • the Father
  • the Son, and
  • the Holy Spirit

I've always thought this is one of the proofs that God is Trinitarian. I can see the feasibility of Paul's first answer as well, though one could question the likeness of an angel with a man, who is flesh and bones.

Mike

Bob replied:

Adam —

It is a curious question, I'm wondering why you ask.

  • Are you a non-Christian?

Christians follow the God of the Jewish people, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, however because of Jesus, we know the mystery of God is triune, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. One God
in nature, three distinct persons. There is much more to this mystery but for the sake of brevity
I will leave it there.

The English equivalent of the Hebrew name for God as revealed in the Old Testament of the Bible is roughly, I Am who Am. It may seem odd to us to have such a name but it underscores that fact that God is the center of all reality.

In practice, Christians pray to the Father, Jesus, and Holy Spirit individually and collectively.

If you read the New Testament you will see how Jesus taught us to pray and worship in much greater detail.

Peace,

Bob Kirby

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