Bringing you the "Good News" of Jesus Christ and His Church While PROMOTING CATHOLIC Apologetic Support groups loyal to the Holy Father and Church's magisterium
Home About
AskACatholic.com
What's New? Resources The Church Family Life Mass and
Adoration
Ask A Catholic
Knowledge base
AskACatholic Disclaimer
Search the
AskACatholic Database
Donate and
Support our work
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
New Questions
Cool Catholic Videos
About Saints
Disciplines and Practices
Purgatory and Indulgences
About the Holy Mass
About Mary
Searching and Confused
Homosexual Issues
Life and Family
No Salvation Outside the Church
Sacred Scripture
non-Catholic Cults
Justification and Salvation
The Pope and Papacy
The Sacraments
back
Relationships and Marriage situations
Specific people, organizations and events
Doctrine and Teachings
Specific Practices
Church Internals
Church History


Ruth wrote:

Hi, guys —

I am a Protestant Christian who is married. I got married in 2005 to an Indian Protestant in India. Since I have come home, I have done research on Church history. My study of Church history has cleared up some of my questions on how the Church in India sees things so differently than the west. I have come to see the Early Church as more Catholic than Protestant.

  • My question is can I convert to the Catholic Church with out my husband?

He wants to stay Pentecostal. We have one son that is autistic. Currently I am not going to church because my son needs around-the-clock care. My husband will not allow my son to be Catholic. We don't take him to any church because he is disruptive.

  • My question is can I be the only one in my family to convert?

Thank you for answering my questions.

Ruth

  { Can I join the Catholic faith even if my Pentecostal husband doesn't want to? }

Mike replied:

Hi Ruth!

Thanks for the question.

You said:
I am a Protestant Christian who is married. I got married in 2005 to an Indian Protestant in India. Since I have come home, I have done research on Church history. My study of Church history has cleared up some of my questions on how the Church in India sees things so differently than the west. I have come to see the Early Church as more Catholic than Protestant.

  • My question is can I convert to the Catholic Church with out my husband?

Of course you can! Below is a link to a web site address where you can find the closest Catholic diocese to you. Just make an appointment with the pastor at a nearby Catholic parish and he can address any marital or family concerns you may have.

http://www.catholic-hierarchy.org/diocese

What you have discovered in the writings of the Early Church, is what I hope all Protestants will discover. For those interested, they can find out more at my new web site:

BibleBeltCatholics.com

You said:
He wants to stay Pentecostal. We have one son that is autistic. Currently I am not going to church because my son needs around-the-clock care. My husband will not allow my son to be Catholic. We don't take him to any church because he is disruptive.

  • My question is can I be the only one in my family to convert?

Yes! You may be the only one but you'll bring many graces into your family life by becoming a Catholic.

Again, the pastor or priest who you meet with should be able to help address all the issues you have including:

  • your husband
  • your autistic child, and
  • not being able to get to Mass.

This posting has quotes from the Catechism over a few concerns the Church has about mixed-marriages:

Although the Catholic Church is always in a missionary, Pentecostal mode, or should be, your husband may be interested in the Catholic Charismatic renewal, a part of the Church which emphasizes the gifts of the Holy Spirit in the Church.

I hope this helps,

Mike

Please report any and all typos or grammatical errors.
Suggestions for this web page and the web site can be sent to Mike Humphrey
© 2012 Panoramic Sites
The Early Church Fathers Church Fathers on the Primacy of Peter. The Early Church Fathers on the Catholic Church and the term Catholic. The Early Church Fathers on the importance of the Roman Catholic Church centered in Rome.