Bringing you the "Good News" of Jesus Christ and His Church While PROMOTING CATHOLIC Apologetic Support groups loyal to the Holy Father and Church's magisterium
Home About
AskACatholic.com
What's New? Resources The Church Family Life Mass and
Adoration
Ask A Catholic
Knowledge base
AskACatholic Disclaimer
Search the
AskACatholic Database
Donate and
Support our work
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
New Questions
Cool Catholic Videos
About Saints
Disciplines and Practices
Purgatory and Indulgences
About the Holy Mass
About Mary
Searching and Confused
Homosexual Issues
Life and Family
No Salvation Outside the Church
Sacred Scripture
non-Catholic Cults
Justification and Salvation
The Pope and Papacy
The Sacraments
Relationships and Marriage situations
Specific people, organizations and events
Doctrine and Teachings
back
Specific Practices
Church Internals
Church History


Dick Hoey wrote:

Hi, guys —

Why does the Church worship on Sunday, the first day of the week, when the Bible teaches one should worship on Saturday, the seventh day of the week?

Dick

  { Why worship on Sunday, when we should be worshipping on Saturday? }

Mike replied:

Hi, Dick —

Thanks for the question.

My colleague Eric already answered that question in this posting:

You may want to first check our knowledge base next time.

Mike

Dick replied:

Good Morning Mike,

Thank you for taking the time to reply to my question.

  • Is there Bible text for which the Church is granted permission to change God's Holy law?
  • I recognize that the Church father's taught and practiced this change but where do we find that the law giver (God) Himself changed His Ten Commandments?
  • If not, are we not taking a prerogative that belongs to God alone?

Thanks for your help. I am looking forward to hearing back from you.

God bless,

Dick Hoey

Mike replied:

Hi, Dick —

The law giver (Jesus, who is God Incarnate) delegated, before ascending into Heaven His divine authority to guide, watch over and protect His Teachings and the administration of His Church to St. Peter and the successors that would follow him. (Matthew 16:13-20)

Also check this out from our colleagues at Catholic Answers:

Within it, they state:

However, passages of Scripture such as Acts 20:7, 1 Corinthians 16:2, Colossians 2:16-17, and Revelation 1:10 indicate that, even during New Testament times,
the Sabbath is no longer binding and that Christians are to worship on the Lord's day, Sunday, instead.

You also my be interested in my Scripture passages page.

http://www.askacatholic.com/ScripturePassages

Mike

Dick replied:

Hi, Mike —

I am not trying to be hard to get along with but these Scriptures do not say that God Himself changed His law. I have found this in the Holy Scriptures and from my studies:

Acts 20:7 — See the New English Bible. It tells us that this meeting was on Saturday night and, from the context, Paul is leaving the next day, so he is meeting with them for the last time.

1 Corinthians 16:2 — It speaks to collections (donations) be stored and given to Paul for the Church in Jerusalem. It speaks nothing about a worship service.
(See Acts 17:2, Acts 18:1-4 and Acts 13:42-44)

Colossians 2:16-17 Please see Ezekiel 45:17. It speaks directly to the services connected to the Old Testament Sanctuary. See also Leviticus 23: There were other Sabbath days connected with the Jewish Holy days other then the seventh day Sabbath.

Revelation 1:10 - It says the Lord's Day but, in its context, it does not tell us what day that is. If I go strictly by the Bible, my conclusion would be the Sabbath, the seventh day of the week because Jesus claimed Lordship of the Sabbath.
(See Mark 2:28, Luke 6:5  and Matthew 12:8)

  • Is Church authority above the Bible?

I do not ask this question with an arrogant spirit.

Thanks for your help. I look forward to your reply.

God bless,

Dick

Mike replied:

Hi, Dick —

You said:
If I go strictly by the Bible, my conclusion would be the Sabbath, the seventh day of the week because Jesus claimed Lordship of the Sabbath.

OK, if you go strictly by the Bible, you, presuming you are a Christian, don't being in the Trinity, Incarnation, imputed righteousness, an altar call or the Bible itself, because none of those words ARE IN THE BIBLE.

You said:
Is Church authority above the Bible?

The following is from the Compendium of the Catechism of the Catholic Church and should address you question completely. (Read Questions 11 to 16 to get the context but note #17 below.)

The Transmission of Divine Revelation

11. Why and in what way is divine revelation transmitted?

God “desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth”
(1 Timothy 2:4), that is, of Jesus Christ. For this reason, Christ must be proclaimed to all according to his own command, “Go forth and teach all nations”
(Matthew 28:19). And this is brought about by Apostolic Tradition.

12. What is Apostolic Tradition?

Apostolic Tradition is the transmission of the message of Christ, brought about from the very beginnings of Christianity by means of preaching, bearing witness, institutions, worship, and inspired writings. The apostles transmitted all they received from Christ and learned from the Holy Spirit to their successors, the bishops, and through them to all generations until the end of the world.

13. In what ways does Apostolic Tradition occur?

Apostolic Tradition occurs in two ways: through the living transmission of the word of God (also simply called Tradition) and through Sacred Scripture which is the same proclamation of salvation in written form.

14. What is the relationship between Tradition and Sacred Scripture?

Tradition and Sacred Scripture are bound closely together and communicate one with the other. Each of them makes present and fruitful in the Church the mystery of Christ. They flow out of the same divine well-spring and together make up one sacred deposit of faith from which the Church derives her certainty about revelation.

15. To whom is the deposit of faith entrusted?

The Apostles entrusted the deposit of faith to the whole of the Church. Thanks to its supernatural sense of faith the people of God as a whole, assisted by the Holy Spirit and guided by the Magisterium of the Church, never ceases to welcome, to penetrate more deeply and to live more fully from the gift of divine revelation.

16. To whom is given the task of authentically interpreting the deposit of faith?

The task of giving an authentic interpretation of the deposit of faith has been entrusted to the living teaching office of the Church alone, that is, to the successor of Peter, the Bishop of Rome, and to the bishops in communion with him. To this Magisterium, which in the service of the Word of God enjoys the certain charism of truth, belongs also the task of defining dogmas which are formulations of the truths contained in divine Revelation. This authority of the Magisterium also extends to those truths necessarily connected with Revelation.

17. What is the relationship between Scripture, Tradition and the Magisterium?

Scripture, Tradition, and the Magisterium are so closely united with each other that one of them cannot stand without the others. Working together, each in its own way, under the action of the one Holy Spirit, they all contribute effectively to the salvation of souls.

You may find this posting interesting as well:

Is the Bible written by Catholics, for Catholics, for use in Catholic worship, the Holy Mass?

Finally, one of my colleagues, John, replied to another question saying:

Scripture tells me Jesus Christ established a Church. He sent His Holy Spirit to lead and guide the Church. He gave the Church spiritual gifts in the form of "offices". He founded His Church on twelve Apostles; Peter chief among them. He promised Peter and the Apostles that the Gates of Hell would not prevail against the Church. In doing so, He guaranteed that the Church could not teach error when defining a matter of faith and morals. He gave Peter special authority as chief of the Apostles. He gave him the keys of the Kingdom. (Matthew 16:13-20)

So behind the teachings of the Church, stand the promise of our Lord to protect the Church from officially teaching an error in matters of faith and morals. That doesn't mean that Church leaders wouldn't fail to follow those teachings. One just needs to look at the recent scandals. Better yet, just look at Judas — you can't fail to follow Christ's teaching, much more than Judas.

St. Paul wrote to Timothy that the "pillar and foundation of the truth is the Church" (1 Timothy 3:15), so when I accept a doctrine which emotionally is hard to swallow, I'm fundamentally relying on the promise of Christ. Without that meaning of Christ's Promise and the Holy Spirit, then the Church is simply an organization or a bunch guys wearing cool hats telling us what to do. If that's the case, we have no reliable proof that Jesus:

  • did anything
  • taught anything
  • rose from the dead, or
  • perhaps even existed.

John

Mike

Eric replied:

Dick wrote:
1 Corinthians 16:2 — It speaks to collections (donations) be stored and given to Paul for the Church in Jerusalem. It speaks nothing about a worship service.
(See Acts 17:2, Acts 18:1-4 and Acts 13:42-44)

Even today, collections are taken during worship services.

  • Why would they go through the effort of taking a collection on Sunday when they just met on Saturday to worship?

That doesn't make sense. What makes sense is to take a collection when you come together for worship.

The verses you mention refer to Jewish worship. Note that usually when the apostles are visiting the synagogue, they are evangelizing the Jews (Acts 17:2, 18:4, 13:45-46). Obviously, the synagogues would be empty on Sunday so the apostles went in on Saturday.

That being said, Jewish Christians, up until the point they were expelled from the synagogue in A.D. 70, often worshiped both with the other Jews in synagogue and with the Christians on the Lord's Day.

Dick wrote:
Colossians 2:16-17 Please see Ezekiel 45:17. It speaks directly to the services connected to the Old Testament Sanctuary. See also Leviticus 23: There were other Sabbath days connected with the Jewish Holy days other then the seventh day Sabbath.

Yes, and so no one should judge those who worship on Sunday.

Dick wrote:
Revelation 1:10 - It says the Lord's Day but, in its context, it does not tell us what day that is.

Tradition and history tells us that the early Christians understood "the Lord's Day" to be Sunday. This is why in languages such as Spanish, Sunday is called "Domingo", a word related to the Latin word "Dominus", "Lord". However, in this particular case, it could also mean the Day of Judgment, or it could mean both.

Dick wrote:
If I go strictly by the Bible, my conclusion would be the Sabbath, the seventh day of the week because Jesus claimed Lordship of the Sabbath. (See Mark 2:28, Luke 6:5  and Matthew 12:8)

If Jesus was Lord of the Sabbath, he could certainly move its observance to Sunday.

I will also note that nothing in the Old Testament compelled Jews to worship on the Sabbath. The Torah says nothing about it; it just says do no work on the Sabbath. The custom of going to synagogue isn't even found in the Old Testament. So if you want to argue that the Bible compels us to worship on Saturday, you'd be mistaken.

Have you read this article?

Eric

Dick replied:

Hi, Mike —

I do believe in:

  • the Trinity
  • Incarnation
  • imputed righteousness
  • an altar call and
  • the Bible and

I know that they are not spoken of specifically in these terms in Scripture but throughout the Scriptures, the Law of God is held in high esteem because it came from Him written in stone with His own finger. If it came from His hand (and it did) then He alone must rewrite it or change it.

I believe I asked an honest question and by no means am I trying to be judgmental or antagonistic in my attitude toward anyone. I am sorry if I have offended you in any way; that is not my purpose. Truth is what I seek. For you to convince me, you have to give me a "thus says the Lord" quote.

I would look forward to any Scripture you might be able to forward that would answer my question.

God bless you Mike,

Dick

Mike replied:

I'm sorry Dick, I can't help you.

We have answered your question:

Acts 20:7, 1 Corinthians 16:2, Colossians 2:16-17, and Revelation 1:10

Eric has elaborated on the reasoning, yet you rationalize the Word is not saying what it is saying.

That's the best we can do — Give you the Word.

Something, not to argue, but to ponder on:

  • Is an acorn an Oak tree?
  • If not, why not?

At its infancy stages, in essence, yes, a acorn is an Oak tree. Nevertheless, the acorn develops, but does NOT change in essence. The same is true with the Church then and the Church now.

  • Did the Church back in 33AD look like the Catholic Church today?

No — just like an acorn doesn't look like an oak tree.

  • Are they the same in essence?

Yes.

Try searching our knowledge base for similar answers.

You said:
I do believe in:

  • the Trinity
  • Incarnation
  • imputed righteousness
  • an altar call and
  • the Bible and

I know that they are not spoken of specifically in these terms in Scripture

  • Then how can you belief in Sola Scriptura?

It would seem, based on your own denominations beliefs, you are not faithful to Sola Scriptura or your Christian denomination?

Mike

Please report any and all typos or grammatical errors.
Suggestions for this web page and the web site can be sent to Mike Humphrey
© 2012 Panoramic Sites
The Early Church Fathers Church Fathers on the Primacy of Peter. The Early Church Fathers on the Catholic Church and the term Catholic. The Early Church Fathers on the importance of the Roman Catholic Church centered in Rome.