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Barbara wrote:

Hi, guys —

I am a female who has been baptized and confirmed into the Catholic Church as a child however,
I converted to Islam after being asked to marry my partner who was not Catholic.

Now, I have decided to return to the Church.

  • If and how would this be possible?

Barbara

  { I was raised Catholic, converted to Islam, but now want to return to the Church. }

Mike replied:

Hi, Barbara —

Thanks for your question; and welcome home!

We had a similar question here:

where my colleague John said:

  • go see your local priest
  • have your Confession heard, and
  • come on home to the Church.

Because Islam is totally contrary to any form of Christianity I would strongly encourage you to buy a Catechism of the Catholic Church and study it. The main theological split between Catholic Christianity and Islam is the relationship between the Creator — God and his children.

  1. In Islam, this relationship is manifested as a [Master/slave] relationship, where the Master just gives orders and the slaves obey; the relationship is a distant one between Master and slave.

  2. In Catholic Christianity, as well as most of Christianity, this relationship is a
    [loving Father/loving Son] relationship, where the Father is there to protect his children while respecting their free will. The obedient child will, out of [his/her] own free will, freely choose to love and obey his [Father/Creator] in return. Any commands the Eternal Father has for his children are always commands that are for the good and holiness of his children. This relationship mirrors family life on earth because the Trinity is a reflection of family life.

    The father of the family reflects the Eternal Father. The mother of the family reflects
    [the Church|Jesus] and the fruit of their love, their children, reflect the Holy Spirit in their family.

    Unlike Islam, there is a close relationship between God and his children; similar to the relationship found within many Christian families.

I would also encourage you to strive to live a sacramental life. This includes receiving the Eucharist every Sunday, and daily, if possible, while going to Confession on a regular basis.
The bishops of America have recommended going to Confession at least once a month. If you,
like many of us, struggle with the sins of the flesh, make sure you go to Confession before receiving the Eucharist. (Saturday afternoon is a great time.)

I would also encourage you to surf the web for a FREE Rosary and start praying it; Our Blessed Mother gave us some GREAT promises for those who recite it on a regular basis.

Final suggestion: Whether you talk to your priest in the Confessional or via an appointment,
ask him about what ministries the parish offers that you can get involved in.

Hope this helps, and again, welcome home!

Mike

Please report any and all typos or grammatical errors.
Suggestions for this web page and the web site can be sent to Mike Humphrey
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